Kenney: Fattening up on Lafayette

Porgies are hot. Actually, they seem to be thriving in our hot weather, according to anglers in the Sound near Orchard Beach, the Whitestone and Throgs Neck bridges and eastward. Porgies are also plentiful along Long Island’s south shore.

Customers on Capt. Bill Doll’s Sheepshead Bay-based Jet have also been finding that true on full-day trips near the north Jersey Shore. Anglers are usually limiting out with their 30 porgies (New York’s daily max bonus allowed for party and charter boaters).

Brooklynite Joe Sett, a Jet regular, not only boasted that porgy limit on Wednesday but also scored pool-fish honors with a 4.5-pound sea bass. He was using a treat of fresh clams in about 30 feet of water.

Fluke fanciers are also still smiling, although the ratio of keeper-sized specimens to throwback seems to be lessening a bit. Locally, flatties abound in both Sheepshead and Jamaica bays as well as as at the usual spots such as North Channel and Marine Parkway Bridges.

Out at Point Lookout, the Super Hawk continues her full-day fluking focus, lately at depths varying from 40 to 90 feet off Jones Beach, where Capt. Steve Kearney also often brings back some sea bass, porgies and triggerfish, too.

Last week that mix inspired Jerry Hahn from Lynbrook, L.I., to bring along his young grandson Mikey Hofenkrieg. While Mikey was having fun sea bassing, Grandpa impressed him by producing a nice-sized 5.7-pound sea bass and also a 6.4-pound pool-winning fluke. These were taken in about 50 feet of water.

One of the Sheepshead Bay party boats that targets most everything is the Marilyn Jean IV. Her full-day trips go after black sea bass and porgies. Her nightly trips scout for striped bass, blues and porgies. Capt. Tony Reyes raves that those porgies are good and plentiful both days and evenings.

One of her Pier 6 dockmates is the Capt’s Lady. Usually a charter boat, she turns into a fluking party boat on Wednesday through Sunday evenings.

Bluefish ranging from cocktail-size to pounds in the teens have gotten their appetites back. Blue-claw crabs and snappers are keeping kids and dock-standees happy. Striped bass are still in deeper, cooler waters. Anglers have gotten some on the troll in Ambrose Channel. Evenings and early mornings are still anglers’ best time frames.

Occasionally, bottom-fishing captains mention Lafayettes in their catch. Since that’s a fish I’m not really familiar with I’ll share what I learned from gamefishingguide.com. This is a small game fish, usually no more than a pound, that swarms into our waters during hot summer months. Anglers appreciate this darting, feisty fighter when it’s hooked while nibbling on small pieces of clam bait or small worms.

The author sure seems to like this fish, rating it one of the best-eating pan fish as well as praising it for its scrappy temperament.

What I found intriguing is that its unusual, capitalized name apparently came about during a tour of the U.S. by the Marquis de Lafayette in 1824-25. How’s that for a bit of trivia!


Daily News – Sports

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